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Dehydrated vs Dry Skin

Dry skin and dehydrated skin are not the same. Most people misdiagnose their skin this way because both conditions leave the skin feeling tight, rough and uncomfortable. Dry skin results from inadequate levels of oils being deposited on the surface of the skin, while dehydration results from a lack of water in the skin. Both are necessary for a healthy, radiant glow.

Common causes of dry skin are:

Genetics – inherited skin type that doesnt receive enough lubrication from sebaceous glands.
Environmental factors – such as exposure to sun, wind, cold, air conditioning, heating, chemicals or cosmetics, and excessive bathing with harsh soaps.
Poor diet – Nutritional deficiencies, especially deficiencies of vitamin A and the B vitamins
Skin conditions – such as dermatitis, eczema, psoriasis or seborrhea

The fundamental need of a dry skin is oil. Oils are vital for the wellbeing of the skin; they keep the surface pliable and young-looking, and act as a natural coating to prevent excessive moisture loss.

How to treat a dry skin:

Drink lots of water. This applies to a dry as well as a dehydrated skin. The skin is the last organ in the body to receive the benefits of the water we drink.
Concentrate on boosting the skin’s levels of nourishment. Begin by treating internally with a diet rich in essential fatty acids, found in oily fish like salmon.
Avoid using harsh products on your skin that may strip away your natural oils – your focus must be on using products that contain oil so that they can seal moisture into the upper layers of your skin.

Dehydration can affect all skin types, whether normal, oily or dry. To test for dehydration, run the side of your finger up your cheek. If you see fine horizontal lines you know you’re dehydrated. Your skin will also tend to have a dull/lacklustre appearance.

Common causes of dehydrated skins are:

Intrinsic Ageing – this is also known as ‘healthy ageing’, which is the normal process of physical change over time and is more about genetics than just lifestyle.
Over Cleansing – the loss of existing sebum (oil) is commonly caused by excessive bathing/showering (especially in hot water) together with the use of harsh foaming cleansers or worse – soaps!
Environmental conditions – cold winds and low temperatures dry out your skin. Without the necessary oils the skin becomes dry and is more prone to premature ageing due to the lack of protective oils.
Lifestyle – you are what you eat – need we say more? Alcohol, sugar and lack of water all help to further dehydrate the skin. This is probably the largest contributing factor to a dehydrated skin.

How to treat a dehydrated skin

Drink lots of water to rehydrate from the inside out. This applies to a dry skin as well.
Avoid further moisture loss through excessive temperature changes (hot or cold) or exposure to harsh soaps/chemicals that upset your skin’s pH levels.
Exfoliate – to remove the layer of dead skin cells that accumulate on the skin, preventing any other creams or moisturisers from absorbing any deeper.

Dehydration can affect all skin types, whether normal, oily or dry. To test for dehydration, run the side of your finger up your cheek. If you see fine horizontal lines you know you’re dehydrated. Your skin will also tend to have a dull/lacklustre appearance.

The best thing you can do for a dry or dehydrated skin is be disciplined! Treat your body to routines that will support it from the inside as well as the outside. Be disciplined with your daily skincare routine. Get into a good habit of cleansing, toning and moisturizing your skin twice a day everyday.
Different circumstances/lifestyle routines will result in you needing to adjust your skincare routine accordingly. Be your own skin detective. Elixir’s philosophy is one of layering. Your skin will let you know when you have given it enough!

Many people – as part of the ageing process – find themselves looking for that ‘something extra’ for their dry skins as they head on down (excuse the pun) into the maturing process! You need look no further than Elixir for that ‘something extra’…

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